ZOOLOGY BY JEREMY ZOLA
BACHELOR OF ZOOLOGY. HAS WORKED WITH WILDCATS, WOLVES, BIRDS OF PREY, AND SEA TURTLES - AMONGST MANY OTHER ANIMALS, EXOTIC AND DOMESTIC. THIS BLOG SERVES AS AN OUTLET FOR MY ENDLESS CURIOSITY FOR THE NATURAL WORLD AND IS MEANT TO BE INTERACTIVE - I ACCEPT SUBMISSIONS, REQUESTS, AND QUESTIONS.
Wednesday, April 16
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A damselfly nymph I found under a rock at Camp Livingston Park two weeks ago. These aquatic nymphs are carnivorous, feeding on mosquito larvae and other small aquatic creatures. Their gills are the three fins seen at the end of the abdomen.

A damselfly nymph I found under a rock at Camp Livingston Park two weeks ago. These aquatic nymphs are carnivorous, feeding on mosquito larvae and other small aquatic creatures. Their gills are the three fins seen at the end of the abdomen.


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Here are a few red velvet mites I found while hiking at the Kelley Nature Preserve last week. They are often found in soil litter or on tree trunks. They are often mistaken for spiders, but are members of the Arachnida class. As grown adults, they are active predators.

Tags: mite red velvet mite arachnid
Wednesday, March 12
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Canadian geese in the creek at Camp Livingston Park yesterday.

Canadian geese in the creek at Camp Livingston Park yesterday.


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Tuesday, March 11
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ODB snatching a mouse from his tree


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I recently purchased two small microscopes that attach to my iPhone camera. One is 45x magnification, and the other one is 65x magnification. Here is an isopod and a damselfly nymph at 45x magnification. I’m still getting the hang of how to take good pictures with them, so these pictures were my first attempt.

Tags: magnification isopod damselfly nymph creek
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Since it was 70 degrees today, I went to Camp Livingston Park for the first time this year. The water was still very cold, but I still managed to find a few creatures. Behold, the first rusty crayfish of the season!

Tags: rusty crayfish crayfish creek cincinnati
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Wednesday, February 19
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3 desert cottontail rabbit babies, my friends saw in Glendale, AZ. Notice the one lying on it’s back seems to have a mass of some sort near it’s left hip.


Photo by Amanda Girardi

3 desert cottontail rabbit babies, my friends saw in Glendale, AZ. Notice the one lying on it’s back seems to have a mass of some sort near it’s left hip.


Photo by Amanda Girardi


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Two coyotes standing in the middle of the road in Glendale, AZ.


Photos by Jacob Stadiem


Sunday, February 16
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This is a Barred Owl sitting on a branch in the woods behind my house. Barred owls weigh about two pounds and reach a height of about 25 inches. They have dark brown eyes as vertical bar markings on their chests. They are frequently seen throughout the eastern United States.


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Friday, January 31
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Three years ago, I had the opportunity to work at the Israeli Sea Turtle Rescue Center in Michmoret, Israel. I prepared the daily diet for 8 Green, and Olive Ridley sea turtles and also cleaned their pools. I also got to work with some awesome people who were extremely passionate about rescuing and rehabilitating sea turtles.


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Wednesday, January 22
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ODB chillin in my sleeve

ODB chillin in my sleeve


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Sunday, January 19
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During the months of September and October, I had the pleasure of babysitting my co-worker’s chinchilla, Chuckles. This is a video of him taking a dust bath, which is how they keep their soft coats clean, since water damages it.


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Just watching some TV with da homie ODB.


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Thursday, January 16
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At my last class of last semester, we got to meet one of the pottos at the Cincinnati Zoo. Pottos are nocturnal primates that live in the canopy of the rain forests of Africa. They move very slowly and always grip the branch with at least 2 limbs. They are omnivorous, eating fruit, tree gum, insects, and they have even been known to catch bats and small birds.

At my last class of last semester, we got to meet one of the pottos at the Cincinnati Zoo. Pottos are nocturnal primates that live in the canopy of the rain forests of Africa. They move very slowly and always grip the branch with at least 2 limbs. They are omnivorous, eating fruit, tree gum, insects, and they have even been known to catch bats and small birds.


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A few months ago, I posted this same picture of one of the baby squirrels my co-worker rescued and is raising/rehabbing. When he rescued them, their eyes and ears were still closed and he was syringe-feeding them. I went to his house in December and they are getting big!


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