ZOOLOGY BY JEREMY ZOLA
BACHELOR OF ZOOLOGY. HAS WORKED WITH WILDCATS, WOLVES, BIRDS OF PREY, AND SEA TURTLES - AMONGST MANY OTHER ANIMALS, EXOTIC AND DOMESTIC. THIS BLOG SERVES AS AN OUTLET FOR MY ENDLESS CURIOSITY FOR THE NATURAL WORLD AND IS MEANT TO BE INTERACTIVE - I ACCEPT SUBMISSIONS, REQUESTS, AND QUESTIONS.
Friday, April 29
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The Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia),  colloquially known as the yak-killer hornet, is the world’s largest hornet, native to temperate and tropical Eastern Asia. Its body length is approximately 50 mm (2 in), with a wingspan of about 76 mm (3 in). The sting of the Asian giant hornet is about 6 mm (¼ in) in length, and injects an especially potent venom that contains a cytolytic peptide (specifically, a mastoparan) that can damage tissue by stimulating phospholipase action. Each year in Japan, the human death toll caused by Asian giant hornet stings exceeds that of all other venomous and non-venomous wild animals combined, including wild bears and venomous snakes. (Wiki.)

The Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia),  colloquially known as the yak-killer hornet, is the world’s largest hornet, native to temperate and tropical Eastern Asia. Its body length is approximately 50 mm (2 in), with a wingspan of about 76 mm (3 in). The sting of the Asian giant hornet is about 6 mm (¼ in) in length, and injects an especially potent venom that contains a cytolytic peptide (specifically, a mastoparan) that can damage tissue by stimulating phospholipase action. Each year in Japan, the human death toll caused by Asian giant hornet stings exceeds that of all other venomous and non-venomous wild animals combined, including wild bears and venomous snakes. (Wiki.)

Tags: asian giant hornet hornet hymentoptera social insects insect
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