ZOOLOGY BY JEREMY ZOLA
BACHELOR OF ZOOLOGY. HAS WORKED WITH WILDCATS, WOLVES, BIRDS OF PREY, AND SEA TURTLES - AMONGST MANY OTHER ANIMALS, EXOTIC AND DOMESTIC. THIS BLOG SERVES AS AN OUTLET FOR MY ENDLESS CURIOSITY FOR THE NATURAL WORLD AND IS MEANT TO BE INTERACTIVE - I ACCEPT SUBMISSIONS, REQUESTS, AND QUESTIONS.
Monday, February 13
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Chrysopelea, or more commonly known as the flying snake, is a genus that belongs to the family Colubridae. Flying snakes are mildly venomous, though they are considered harmless because their toxicity is not dangerous to humans. The combination of sucking in its stomach and making a motion of lateral undulation in the air makes it possible for the snake to glide in the air, where it also manages to save energy compared to travel on the ground and dodge terrestrial bounded predators. The concave wing that a snake creates in sucking its stomach, flattens its body to up to twice its width from back of the head to the anal vent, which is close to the end of the snake’s tail, causes the cross section of the snake’s body to resemble the cross section of a frisbee. (Wiki.)
photo by: wvwnews.net

Chrysopelea, or more commonly known as the flying snake, is a genus that belongs to the family Colubridae. Flying snakes are mildly venomous, though they are considered harmless because their toxicity is not dangerous to humans. The combination of sucking in its stomach and making a motion of lateral undulation in the air makes it possible for the snake to glide in the air, where it also manages to save energy compared to travel on the ground and dodge terrestrial bounded predators. The concave wing that a snake creates in sucking its stomach, flattens its body to up to twice its width from back of the head to the anal vent, which is close to the end of the snake’s tail, causes the cross section of the snake’s body to resemble the cross section of a frisbee. (Wiki.)

photo by: wvwnews.net

Tags: flying snake snake reptile flying
220 notes
Sunday, August 28
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Puffin
 By John & Tina Reid

Puffin

 By John & Tina Reid

Tags: puffin bird iceland flying
22 notes
reblogged via sekkachi
Thursday, August 25
Permalink Tags: vampire bats bats flying mammals national geographic veins
24 notes
Monday, August 22
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Mexican Free-Tailed Bats (National Geographic)

Mexican Free-Tailed Bats (National Geographic)

Tags: bats mexican free tailed bats mammals flying nocturnal national geographic
269 notes
Monday, August 8
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The Whooping Crane (Grus americana), the tallest North American bird, is an endangered crane species named for its whooping sound. Along with the Sandhill Crane, it is one of only two crane species found in North America. The whooping crane’s lifespan is estimated to be 22 to 24 years in the wild. There is an estimate of only 400+ left in the wild. These birds forage while walking in shallow water or in fields, sometimes probing with their bills. They are omnivorous and slightly more inclined to animal material than most other cranes. In their Texas wintering grounds, this species feeds on various crustaceans, mollusks, fish (such as eel), berries, small reptiles and aquatic plants.(Wiki)

The Whooping Crane (Grus americana), the tallest North American bird, is an endangered crane species named for its whooping sound. Along with the Sandhill Crane, it is one of only two crane species found in North America. The whooping crane’s lifespan is estimated to be 22 to 24 years in the wild. There is an estimate of only 400+ left in the wild. These birds forage while walking in shallow water or in fields, sometimes probing with their bills. They are omnivorous and slightly more inclined to animal material than most other cranes. In their Texas wintering grounds, this species feeds on various crustaceans, mollusks, fish (such as eel), berries, small reptiles and aquatic plants.(Wiki)

Tags: whooping crane crane bird tall North America flying
Friday, August 5
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The Hoopoe, Upupa epops, is a colourful bird that is found across Afro-Eurasia, notable for its distinctive ‘crown’ of feathers. The Hoopoe is a medium sized bird, 25–32 cm (9.8-12.6 in) long, with a 44–48 cm (17.3–19 in) wingspan weighing 46-89 g (1.6-3.1 oz). The diet of the Hoopoe is mostly composed of insects, although small  reptiles and frogs as well as some plant matter such as seeds and  berries are sometimes taken as well. It is a solitary forager which  typically feeds on the ground. More commonly their foraging style is to stride on relatively open  ground and periodically pause to probe the ground with the full length  of their bill. Insect larvae, pupae and mole crickets are detected by the bill and either extracted or dug out with the strong feet. (Wiki.)

The Hoopoe, Upupa epops, is a colourful bird that is found across Afro-Eurasia, notable for its distinctive ‘crown’ of feathers. The Hoopoe is a medium sized bird, 25–32 cm (9.8-12.6 in) long, with a 44–48 cm (17.3–19 in) wingspan weighing 46-89 g (1.6-3.1 oz). The diet of the Hoopoe is mostly composed of insects, although small reptiles and frogs as well as some plant matter such as seeds and berries are sometimes taken as well. It is a solitary forager which typically feeds on the ground. More commonly their foraging style is to stride on relatively open ground and periodically pause to probe the ground with the full length of their bill. Insect larvae, pupae and mole crickets are detected by the bill and either extracted or dug out with the strong feet. (Wiki.)

Tags: hoopoe bird flying feathers europe africa israel
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Sunday, July 31
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Kuhl’s Flying Gecko (Ptychozoon kuhli) is a species of gecko which has adaptations to its skin, including flaps on either side of  its body, webbed feet, and a flattened tail to allow it to glide over  short distances. These geckos have a remarkable camouflage. The flaps of  skin along their sides help them blend with tree bark. Often, the eyes  are the only way to see them. Flying Geckos, like many other gecko species, have evolved intricate toe  pads with microscopic hairs that can adhere to nearly any surface,  including glass. (Wiki.)

Kuhl’s Flying Gecko (Ptychozoon kuhli) is a species of gecko which has adaptations to its skin, including flaps on either side of its body, webbed feet, and a flattened tail to allow it to glide over short distances. These geckos have a remarkable camouflage. The flaps of skin along their sides help them blend with tree bark. Often, the eyes are the only way to see them. Flying Geckos, like many other gecko species, have evolved intricate toe pads with microscopic hairs that can adhere to nearly any surface, including glass. (Wiki.)

Tags: kuhls flying gecko gecko reptile lizard flying
10 notes
Thursday, June 23
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Sugarglider Eating a Grasshopper

Sugarglider Eating a Grasshopper

Tags: sugarglider Grasshopper eating rodent insect bug flying
22 notes
Friday, May 27
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Soaring Bat

Soaring Bat

Tags: bat flying animal mammal wings
12 notes
Monday, May 16
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Gecko

Gecko

Tags: gecko flying lizard reptile woods
20 notes
Monday, May 9
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Jumping Manta Ray

Jumping Manta Ray

Tags: manta ray flying string ray ocean sea
46 notes
Saturday, May 7
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Draco also known as Flying Dragons is a genus of agamid lizard from South and Southeast Asia. The ribs and their connecting  membrane can be extended to create a wing, the hindlimbs are flattened  and wing-like in cross-section, and a small set of flaps on the neck  serve as a horizontal stabilizer. While not capable of powered flight they often obtain lift in the course  of their gliding flights. Glides as long as 60m have been recorded,  over which the animal loses only 10m in height, which is quite some  distance, considering that one of these lizards is only around 20 cm  long. (Wiki.)

Draco also known as Flying Dragons is a genus of agamid lizard from South and Southeast Asia. The ribs and their connecting membrane can be extended to create a wing, the hindlimbs are flattened and wing-like in cross-section, and a small set of flaps on the neck serve as a horizontal stabilizer. While not capable of powered flight they often obtain lift in the course of their gliding flights. Glides as long as 60m have been recorded, over which the animal loses only 10m in height, which is quite some distance, considering that one of these lizards is only around 20 cm long. (Wiki.)

Tags: draco lizard flying lizard reptile wings
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