ZOOLOGY BY JEREMY ZOLA
BACHELOR OF ZOOLOGY. HAS WORKED WITH WILDCATS, WOLVES, BIRDS OF PREY, AND SEA TURTLES - AMONGST MANY OTHER ANIMALS, EXOTIC AND DOMESTIC. THIS BLOG SERVES AS AN OUTLET FOR MY ENDLESS CURIOSITY FOR THE NATURAL WORLD AND IS MEANT TO BE INTERACTIVE - I ACCEPT SUBMISSIONS, REQUESTS, AND QUESTIONS.
Sunday, January 29
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The Oilbird (Steatornis caripensis) is a bird found in the northern areas of South America. They are nocturnal feeders on the fruits of the Oil Palm and tropical laurels, and are the only nocturnal fruit eating birds in the world. They forage at night, navigating by echolocation in the same way as bats, but with a high-pitched clicking sound audible to humans. During the day the birds rest on cave ledges and leave to find their food at night. Although it forages by sight, the Oilbird is one of only a few birds, and the only nocturnal one, known to navigate by echolocation in sufficiently poor light conditions, using a series of sharp audible clicks for this purpose. It also produces a variety of harsh screams while in its caves. Entering a cave with a light especially provokes these raucous calls; they also may be heard as the birds prepare to emerge from a cave at dusk. (Wiki.)
photo by surfbirds.com

The Oilbird (Steatornis caripensis) is a bird found in the northern areas of South America. They are nocturnal feeders on the fruits of the Oil Palm and tropical laurels, and are the only nocturnal fruit eating birds in the world. They forage at night, navigating by echolocation in the same way as bats, but with a high-pitched clicking sound audible to humans. During the day the birds rest on cave ledges and leave to find their food at night. Although it forages by sight, the Oilbird is one of only a few birds, and the only nocturnal one, known to navigate by echolocation in sufficiently poor light conditions, using a series of sharp audible clicks for this purpose. It also produces a variety of harsh screams while in its caves. Entering a cave with a light especially provokes these raucous calls; they also may be heard as the birds prepare to emerge from a cave at dusk. (Wiki.)

photo by surfbirds.com

Tags: oilbird bird echolocation nocturnal fruit avian
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