ZOOLOGY BY JEREMY ZOLA
BACHELOR OF ZOOLOGY. HAS WORKED WITH WILDCATS, WOLVES, BIRDS OF PREY, AND SEA TURTLES - AMONGST MANY OTHER ANIMALS, EXOTIC AND DOMESTIC. THIS BLOG SERVES AS AN OUTLET FOR MY ENDLESS CURIOSITY FOR THE NATURAL WORLD AND IS MEANT TO BE INTERACTIVE - I ACCEPT SUBMISSIONS, REQUESTS, AND QUESTIONS.
Wednesday, April 4
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Gibbon
m-ammals:

Gibbon
Gibbons are the animals we think of when we picture primates swinging gracefully through the rain forest.
These acrobatic mammals, endemic to the dense forests of southern Asia, are perfectly adapted to life in the trees and rarely descend to the ground. They have strong, hook-shaped hands for grasping branches, comically outsize arms for reaching faraway limbs, and long, powerful legs for propelling and gasping. Their shoulder joints are even specially adapted to allow greater range of motion when swinging.
Their dramatic form of locomotion, called brachiating, can move gibbons through the jungle at up to 35 miles (56 kilometers) an hour, bridging gaps as wide as 50 feet (15 meters) with a single swinging leap. Brachiating also gives gibbons the unique advantage of being able to swing out and grab fruits growing at the end of branches, which limits competition for their favorite foods.
When gibbons walk, whether along branches or in the rare instances when they descend to the ground, they often do so on two feet, throwing their arms above their head for balance. They are the most bipedal of all non-human primates and are often studied for clues to what evolutionary pressures may have led to human walking.
There are 15 recognized species of gibbons ranging from northeastern India to southern China to Borneo. They are all tailless, and their long coats vary from cream to brown to black. Many have white markings on their faces, hands, and feet. The largest species are known as siamangs, and can grow to 29 pounds (13 kilograms). Smaller species reach only about nine pounds (four kilograms).
Gibbons thrive on the abundant fruit trees in their tropical range, and are especially fond of figs. They will occasionally supplement their diet with leaves and insects.
Gibbons are monogamous (a rare trait among primates) and live in family groups consisting of an adult pair and their young offspring. The family will stake out a territory and defend it using loud, haunting calls that can echo for miles throughout the forest. Mated pairs, and even whole families, will sing long, complex songs together. Some species have even adapted large throat pouches to amplify their calls.
These iconic tree dwellers are among the most threatened primates on Earth. Their habitat is disappearing at a rapid rate, and they are often captured and sold as pets or killed for use in traditional medicines. All but one species of gibbon is listed as endangered or critically endangered.
Source

Gibbon

m-ammals:

Gibbon

Gibbons are the animals we think of when we picture primates swinging gracefully through the rain forest.

These acrobatic mammals, endemic to the dense forests of southern Asia, are perfectly adapted to life in the trees and rarely descend to the ground. They have strong, hook-shaped hands for grasping branches, comically outsize arms for reaching faraway limbs, and long, powerful legs for propelling and gasping. Their shoulder joints are even specially adapted to allow greater range of motion when swinging.

Their dramatic form of locomotion, called brachiating, can move gibbons through the jungle at up to 35 miles (56 kilometers) an hour, bridging gaps as wide as 50 feet (15 meters) with a single swinging leap. Brachiating also gives gibbons the unique advantage of being able to swing out and grab fruits growing at the end of branches, which limits competition for their favorite foods.

When gibbons walk, whether along branches or in the rare instances when they descend to the ground, they often do so on two feet, throwing their arms above their head for balance. They are the most bipedal of all non-human primates and are often studied for clues to what evolutionary pressures may have led to human walking.

There are 15 recognized species of gibbons ranging from northeastern India to southern China to Borneo. They are all tailless, and their long coats vary from cream to brown to black. Many have white markings on their faces, hands, and feet. The largest species are known as siamangs, and can grow to 29 pounds (13 kilograms). Smaller species reach only about nine pounds (four kilograms).

Gibbons thrive on the abundant fruit trees in their tropical range, and are especially fond of figs. They will occasionally supplement their diet with leaves and insects.

Gibbons are monogamous (a rare trait among primates) and live in family groups consisting of an adult pair and their young offspring. The family will stake out a territory and defend it using loud, haunting calls that can echo for miles throughout the forest. Mated pairs, and even whole families, will sing long, complex songs together. Some species have even adapted large throat pouches to amplify their calls.

These iconic tree dwellers are among the most threatened primates on Earth. Their habitat is disappearing at a rapid rate, and they are often captured and sold as pets or killed for use in traditional medicines. All but one species of gibbon is listed as endangered or critically endangered.

Source

Tags: gibbon mammal primate ape tree
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reblogged via sadgsgfkt78-deactivated20130112
Sunday, March 18
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Exotic Bird Eating Lizard by Garion

Exotic Bird Eating Lizard by Garion

Tags: exotic bird bird lizard eating jungle tree fowl
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reblogged via deviantbirds
Monday, March 12
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Young Sloth by Verte Ruelle

Young Sloth by Verte Ruelle

Tags: sloth tree jungle mammal primate
4,283 notes
reblogged via funkysafari
Wednesday, December 28
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European Treefrog by Olle Albinsson

European Treefrog by Olle Albinsson

Tags: european treefrog frog tree amphibian europe
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reblogged via rhamphotheca
Thursday, December 15
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Brown Bear Sleeping by Bob Jagendorf

Brown Bear Sleeping by Bob Jagendorf

Tags: sleeping bear mammal grizzly brown wood tree
166 notes
reblogged via animals-animals-animals
Friday, December 9
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Parson’s Chameleon by Sibylle Stofer

Parson’s Chameleon by Sibylle Stofer

Tags: chameleon parsons chameleon lizard reptile tree jungle
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reblogged via animals-animals-animals
Friday, December 2
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Barn Owl

Barn Owl

Tags: barn owl owl bird yucka plant tree
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Monday, November 28
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Black and Red Broadbills

Black and Red Broadbills

Tags: black and red broadbills birds jungle woods tree bird
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Tuesday, October 4
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rhamphotheca:

Kermode Bear in Tree, British Columbia
A mother of two cubs climbs a Pacific crab apple tree to grab its tart  and tiny fruit. In years when autumn salmon numbers are low, the bears  must find other food, such as wild berries, lupine roots, and mussels.
(via: National Geo)   (photo: Paul Nicklen)
* “Kermode bears” are a subspecies of the American Black Bear, Ursus americanus, that live in the American Pacific NW. 1/10 of the population are blond. - Paxon.

rhamphotheca:

Kermode Bear in Tree, British Columbia

A mother of two cubs climbs a Pacific crab apple tree to grab its tart and tiny fruit. In years when autumn salmon numbers are low, the bears must find other food, such as wild berries, lupine roots, and mussels.

(via: National Geo)   (photo: Paul Nicklen)

* “Kermode bears” are a subspecies of the American Black Bear, Ursus americanus, that live in the American Pacific NW. 1/10 of the population are blond. - Paxon.

Tags: bear mammal north america tree kermode bear
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reblogged via rhamphotheca
Friday, September 30
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Wolf at Rest

Wolf at Rest

Tags: animal mammal wolf tree tundra forest
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reblogged via whatayaloves
Tuesday, September 27
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Chameleon

Chameleon

Tags: chameleon lizard reptile zoo tree camouflage
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reblogged via peekintomybrain
Monday, September 26
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Snake Eye

Snake Eye

Tags: snake eye reptile predator tree vine snake
1,062 notes
reblogged via realrodawful
Saturday, September 24
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Baby Virginian Opposums

Baby Virginian Opposums

Tags: Virginian Opossum baby animals cute possum opossum mammal tree
3,248 notes
reblogged via vibes-ofsummer
Wednesday, September 21
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Tarsiers

Tarsiers

Tags: animals tarsier mammal primate tree
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reblogged via creepicrawlies
Sunday, September 18
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Bush Baby

Bush Baby

Tags: bush baby primate lemur mammal tree cute small
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